Cases

Wolf v. UPTE

In May 2019, Isaac Wolf filed a federal lawsuit against his employer, the Regents of the University of California, and University Professional & Technical Employees Communications Workers of America Local 9119 for violating his First Amendment rights to free speech and freedom of association. Wolf began…
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Leitch v. AFSCME

On May 1, 2019, nine workers in Illinois government filed a federal class action lawsuit against AFSCME, demanding the union return money taken from their paychecks for union “agency” or “fair share” fees before the Court’s June 2018 ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. If successful, these workers and more than…
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Hannay v. Kent State

Annamarie Hannay, Adda Gape and John Kohl are custodians for student residence halls at Kent State University. Since they started working at the university, they were required to pay money to AFSCME, American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. Several months after the Supreme Court ruling in Janus v.
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Bennett v. AFSCME

Susan Bennett has worked for the Moline-Coal Valley School District since 2009. Since then she has been required to pay either membership dues or non-member fees to AFSCME Local 672. But in June 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the landmark case Janus v. AFSCME that mandatory…
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Sweet v. California Association of Psychiatric Technicians

Alfred Sweet is a psychiatric technician at Atascadero State Hospital in Paso Robles. Sweet joined the California Association of Psychiatric Technicians when he started working at the hospital in 2011 and began making requests to resign and become an agency fee payer in 2014. Those requests were denied. After the…
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O’Callaghan v. Napolitano

Two University of California workers filed a federal lawsuit alleging union dues were illegally deducted from their paychecks. Cara O’Callaghan has worked as the finance manager of the Sport Club program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, since 2009. Jenée Misraje has worked as an administrative assistant at the…
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Oliver v. SEIU

Shalea Oliver has worked as an income maintenance caseworker for the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services since 2014. In her position, she helps a variety of people, including the under or unemployed, disabled and other vulnerable populations in Philadelphia.  As a Philadelphia native, service…
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Adams, et al v. Teamsters

Four mental health workers in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, tried for months to quit their government union, Teamsters Local 429, with no success. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Janus v. AFSCME that it is unconstitutional to require government workers to pay…
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Grossman v. HGEA

In January 2019, the Liberty Justice Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of Patricia Grossman, an employee of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, against the University and the Hawaii Government Employees Association (HGEA) for refusing to allow her to resign union membership. Ms. Grossman has…
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Mandel v. SEIU

In December 2018, the Liberty Justice Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of Illinois school district employee Erich Mandel against his government union, SEIU Local 73 and his employer, Community Consolidated School District 15, for violating his First Amendment rights to free speech and freedom of association.
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Hendrickson v. AFSCME

In November 2018, the Liberty Justice Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of New Mexico state employee Brett Hendrickson against his government union, AFSCME, and the state of New Mexico for violating his First Amendment rights to free speech and freedom of association. Despite the…
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Few v. UTLA

In November 2018, the Liberty Justice Center and California Policy Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of special education teacher Thomas Few against the United Teachers of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Unified School District for violating Few’s First Amendment rights to free speech and freedom of association. Despite…
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Dan Proft v. Kwame Raoul

Individuals, corporations, unions and political parties can give unlimited amounts of money to political candidates, but independent expenditure groups cannot, creating an uneven playing field.
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Cooke v. Illinois State Board of Elections

This case began in February 2016 after David Cooke, a Streator resident, filed a complaint with the Illinois State Board of Elections alleging that the Committee for Frank J. Mautino violated the Illinois Election Code. Attorneys from the Liberty Justice Center have provided free legal representation to Cooke in…
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Vugo v. City of Chicago

Chicago's ban on advertisements in and on ridesharing vehicles – but not in or on taxis and other vehicles – violates drivers' and advertisers' constitutional rights to free speech and equal protection.
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Mendez v. City of Chicago

Chicago has imposed some of the nation's most extreme restrictions on people's ability to share their homes through online platforms such as Airbnb. We're challenging the law for violating homeowners' constitutional rights.
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Harlan v. Scholz

The Liberty Justice Center is challenging an Illinois law that guarantees some voters – but not others – the right to register to vote at their local polling places on Election Day.
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Defending Local Right-to-Work Laws

In December 2015, the village of Lincolnshire, Illinois, sought to protect worker freedom and boost the local economy by becoming the first municipality in the state – and one of the first local governments in the U.S. – to enact a local "Right-to-Work" ordinance. The Liberty Justice Center is defending the law against a union lawsuit challenging it.
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Labell v. City of Chicago

In 2015, Chicago enacted the nation's first tax on streaming entertainment services such as Netflix and Spotify. We're challenging Chicago's amusement tax because it violates the Illinois Constitution, the U.S. Constitution, and federal law.
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Janus v. AFSCME

WE WON! In a major victory for First Amendment rights, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that government workers can no longer be required to pay a union as a condition of working in public service. Learn more about Janus v. AFSCME and what it means for you.
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